bythelight1973

If you wait for perfection, you'll miss life

Hold Still Sally Mann Book Review

Posted on December 18, 2015

 

If you are wondering what to get for the reader/photographer lover in your life for Christmas, birthday or just because, then look no further than Sally Mann’s epic memoir Hold Still.  It seems since the moment the book came out the reviews were off the charts.  Every review that I read praised Hold Still.  Can a memoir especially one that clocks in at almost 500 pages be this good?  Oh, yes it can.  Hold Still did not disappoint.  I do have to confess that Sally Mann is my favorite photographer of all time.  Yes, there are other photographers that I esteem just as highly as Mann, but if I had to say who influenced my style and sensibility it would definitely be Mann.  So with that information at hand you may think I am being biased when I say that Hold Still was an excellent read from start to finish.  The plethora of information that you acquire as you read along about  Sally Mann’s family just kept tumbling out.  Her family history is absolutely fascinating and just when I thought there couldn’t possibly be any more family secrets to top the last one lo and behold I would find myself swept away in an even more “did-this- really- happen- in-her-family?” anecdote.

Of course Mann also writes about the famous (nude) pictures she took of her children when they were young.  I have always loved these beautiful and intimate photos, and as a mother and photographer myself I have often wondered, given all the hoopla her photos gathered after showing them to the world would she do it again?  This particular chapter illuminates Mann’s thought process on what led her to photograph her children in this manner, and yes if she had to do it again she regrets nothing about these pictures.  Good for her.  Good for us.

I walked away from this book with a better sense of the woman behind the lens.  Resonating strongly throughout the book is Mann’s distinct voice.  Her soft southern accent, unique personality and wicked sense of humor is what makes you feel as if Sally Mann herself were sitting across from you and telling you her life story; and her life, career and family history has been an incredible one.  What I encountered in Hold Still Sally Mann is a woman who is brilliant, contemplative, connected, strong, extremely independent and a lover of life.  I’m so thankful that she decided to write this book and I think you’ll enjoy reading it as much as I did.

Foggy, rainy mornings are the best

Posted on October 29, 2015

I opened my front door this morning and to my delight I saw a thick fog blanketing the landscape (I love foggy, rainy landscapes. The colors just pop while the tone of a photograph retains that ethereal quality). I wanted so much to grab my camera, jump in the car and find the perfect scenery to photograph, but mommy duties were calling me so I spent the better part of the morning looking out the window witnessing the changing landscape. Finally, a while later I finally made it outside. It was pouring rain by then, but I headed to the park and managed to take a few shots. Thank goodness I got a chance to shoot. I couldn’t let this gorgeousness pass me by.

Olive Kitteridge

Posted on August 11, 2015

I found the following book at a book sale. If you are looking for something to read and/or watch, like to read stories set in Maine ( I know, I know I have a thing for Maine), enjoy reading novels broken up into short stories or like (I absolutely adore) the actress Frances McDormand then pick up Elizabeth Strout’s book, Olive Kitteridge. The book is really meaty with characters going through an array of life experiences and at the heart of the story is Olive Kitteridge. She is a force, and when I found out Frances McDormand was playing her in the miniseries, I really couldn’t see anyone else playing this role. She didn’t disappoint (not that she ever has). So if you read/see it, I hope you’ll enjoy it as much as I did.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 155 other followers